Obesity Can Be Determined through Young Children’s Oral Bacteria

A senior author of the study and a biology professor at Pentz, Kateryna Makova states that in the United States one in three children is either obese or overweight. Pertaining to this issue, she says that if they can find early indicators of obesity in young children, they can help physicians and parents to take preventive measures.

This study is a part of a bigger project in which clinicians and researchers from the INSIGHT that is led by professor of pediatrics at the Medical Center, Ian Paul, and professor of foods and nutrition at the University of Georgia, Leann Birch. Trials conducted by the INSIGHT contains approximately 300 children and tests in which responsive parenting intervention throughout the initial stage of a child’s life can help in checking the development of obesity. The INSIGHT is also designed in a manner that can help in identifying social and biological risk factors for obesity.

Makova also states that the study shows that how at two years of age child’s oral microbiota is related with their weight gain during their first two years after birth.

A diverse array of microorganisms are filled in the human digestive tract, with beneficial bacteria, that support the immune system and makes sure of proper digestion. Here microbiota plays a significant role in which it shifts when a person’s diet changes and varies greatly from person to person. Previous researches have shown that variation in microbiota has been linked to obesity in some adolescents and adults. However, the potential relationship between weight gain and oral microbiota in children had not been studied in any of the previous studies.