Renewable Energy Production Gaining Strength in Germany

Renewable energy production surged to over 41% of the country’s power supply in March, 2017, with the production touching a record figure of 19.5 TWh. The last month has been spectacular in terms of renewable energy production for Germany with a soaring monthly generation of electricity from wind and solar energy.

Power Production from Renewable Indicate Encouraging Trends

Last month, the nuclear power production touched the nadir since the 1970s. With the marked phase out of nuclear reactors continuing since 2000, the country has planned to shut down all nuclear plants by 2022. Last month also registered a record reduction in nuclear energy for France. On March 18, Germany registered another wind power record in production and reached a figure of 38.5 GW. In March, the combined electricity production from wind and solar energy in Germany totaled 12.5 TWh. Power production from biomass also witnessed a robust growth at 4.5 TWh.

Wide Scale Disclosure of Nuclear Power Plants in Germany and France

These developments were significant in the backdrop of rapidly declining nuclear power production in Germany. Reduction in nuclear energy production in the nation can be partly attributed to the phase out of the reactors since they were built in the mid-1970s and 1980s; the reason being eight reactors of the 19 continue to be in service. However, currently almost half of them are down having gone for an overhaul of some kind and are expected to resume operation soon. Neckarwestheim II, Grohnde, and Brokdorf are the reactors that have gone offline in the recent months. While all of the reactors are scheduled to be shut down tentatively by 2022, Gundremmingen B, will be the first to be closed down. The reactor was reportedly affected with a computer virus and was supposed to go offline in 2016.

A lot of reactors are also poised to go offline in France with the official closure declared for the Fessenheim Nuclear Power Plant. The country has aimed to reduce its reliance on nuclear power generation from 75% of its demand to a remarkable 50% by the end of 2025.